University of Wisconsin–Madison

Is a Nurse Residency Program Right for You?

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Research shows that nurse residency programs improve nurse retention, lower costs and improve nurse preparedness for safe and competent practice. Traditionally available only in acute care settings, GERI-Res seeks to offer the same benefits to long term care organizations with a residency tailored specifically to nursing in the long term care practice environment. GERI-Res curriculum is appropriate for new nursing school graduates as well as experienced nurses new to the long term care environment.

Your Long-Term Care Nursing Workforce Solution – Easy to Implement, Easy to Access

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GERI-Res is turnkey, giving you everything you need to implement a world-class geriatric care residency program. Two program components, Clinical Coach and RN Resident, together create the best learning environment for new nurse success. The Clinical Coach prepares for a mentor role by going through six learning modules. The RN Resident goes through sixteen learning modules, one a week for sixteen weeks. Each module takes about 1 hour, and is paired with exercises, quizzes, and time with the Nurse Coach. The online format means curriculum modules can be accessed anywhere, anytime.

GERI-Res Curriculum

  • GERI-Res RN Resident Course Modules

    Module 1: Intro to Long Term Care
    Module Objectives:

    • Identify signs of general decline in residents approaching end of life;
    • Utilize the FAST tool to assess and document a resident’s stage of dementia;
    • Implement non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions for symptoms of discomfort;
    • Communicate effectively with residents, families, and other professionals at resident end of life and ease the end-of-life processes for the resident; and
    • Differentiate among types of advance directives.

     

    Module 2: Resident Quality of Life
    Module Objectives:

    • Describe the legal and personal rights of the resident;
    • Define the multiple components of resident quality of life;
    • Summarize how care practices can interfere with resident quality of life; and
    • Discuss how to implement practices that support resident quality of life.

     

    Module 3: Communicating with the Team
    Module Objectives:

    • Describe why effective communication in LTC nursing is vital;
    • Identify communication skills and tools to use with CNAs and other health care providers to improve teamwork and care quality; and
    • Use communication skills to collaborate effectively with colleagues.

     

    Module 4: Communicating with Families
    Module Objectives:

    • Hear and appreciate what family members say without becoming defensive;
    • Understand where some family conflicts and concerns originate and how families evaluate quality of care;
    • Identify several strategies to overcome barriers and develop positive, collaborative relationships with family members;
    • Understand how families evaluate the quality of care;
    • Describe some of the areas in which both family and staff describe themselves to be primarily responsible;
    • Advocate for family members and residents where appropriate; and
    • Support family members in areas of concern.

     

    Module 5: Cultural Diversity
    Module Objectives:

    • Have a better understanding of how life course and culture shape experiences and circumstances throughout one’s life.
    • Be able to identify how culture and history influence a person’s perspective and experience.
    • Have increased awareness of how personal experiences and circumstances influence work and life within LTC settings.
    • Know how to apply the principles of person-centered care to engage staff and residents in supporting a culturally competent environment. This includes ways of:
      • Getting to know resident and staff preferences, customs, and beliefs;
      • Empowering residents and staff;
      • Building mutual respect; and
      • Building and supporting teams.

     

    Module 6: Sensory Changes
    Module Objectives:

    • Describe normal age-related changes in vision, hearing, taste, smell, and peripheral sensation experienced as a result of the aging process;
    • Identify factors that can lead to excess disability; and
    • Select interventions to assist with sensory challenges

     

    Module 7: Skin Health
    Module Objectives:

    • Articulate normal versus abnormal variations is skin health in older adults;
    • Care for aging skin;
    • Understand the effective systems and strategies for monitoring skin health in the nursing home setting;
    • Describe evidence-based approaches to treating common skin abnormalities; and
    • List situations where referral to a skin and/or wound specialist is indicated.

     

    Module 8: Pharmacological Considerations
    Module Objectives:

    • Describe how age-related physiologic changes and pathologies common in older adults impact medication absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion;
    • Identify risk factors for Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) in older adults;
    • Explain how polypharmacology impacts risk for adverse effects;
    • Recognize medications that are potentially harmful for older adults; and
    • Implement strategies to enhance the safety and efficacy of pharmacologic therapy for older adults.

     

    Module 9: Geriatric Nutrition
    Module Objectives:

    • List three physical signs of malnutrition and when to refer to a registered dietitian (RD);
    • Name two risk factors for dehydration in frail older adults;
    • Identify signs and symptoms of chewing and swallowing difficulty, when to refer to other professionals, and how to identify appropriate interventions;
    • List goals of diabetes management for older adults in LTC settings; and
    • Describe the changes in appetite during the dying process.

     

    Module 10: End of Life Care
    Module Objectives:

    • Identify signs of general decline in residents approaching end of life;
    • Utilize the FAST tool to assess and document a resident’s stage of dementia;
    • Implement non-pharmacological and pharmacological interventions for symptoms of discomfort;
    • Communicate effectively with residents, families, and other professionals at resident end of life and ease the end-of-life processes for the resident; and
    • Differentiate among types of advance directives.

     

    Module 11: Urinary Incontinence
    Module Objectives:

    • Recognize the risk factors for UI;
    • Distinguish the various types of UI based on symptom history;
    • Assess continence status;
    • Determine the cause of UI in older adults; and
    • Design and implement individualized plans of care.

     

    Module 12: Cognitive Impairment
    Module Objectives:

    • Define how normal age-related changes, dementia, and delirium differ;
    • Identify early changes in mental status;
    • Conduct a mental status assessment;
    • Describe nursing interventions to manage delirium; and
    • Describe nursing interventions to manage dementia-related behavioral symptoms.

     

    Module 13: Depression in Older Adults
    Module Objectives:

    • Recognize common symptoms and atypical presentation of depression;
    • Administer and interpret two common screening tools used for depression in older adults with and without dementia;
    • Assess the risk for suicide; and
    • Learn about different treatment options that have demonstrated efficacy in older adult populations.

     

    Module 14: Pain
    Module Objectives:

    • Identify the adverse consequences of untreated pain;
    • Use and interpret pain assessment tools for both the cognitively intact and the cognitively impaired;
    • Understand the risks and effectiveness of medications and other treatment options; and
    • Identify appropriate pain management and treatment strategies.

     

    Module 15: Maintaining Mobility
    Module Objectives:

    • Recognize the types and risks of limited mobility and the five levels of physical function;
    • Use evidence-based tools and measures to accurately assess mobility status;
    • Demonstrate competency in selection and use of assistive devices and proper footwear;
    • Identify falls risk factors, LTC residents at risk of falls, and interventions to prevent falls;
    • Discuss the issues concerning the use of restraints and alarms; and
    • Effectively collaborate with direct care workers (DCWs) to identify and implement strategies for maximizing resident mobility.

     

    Module 16: Change in Condition and Care Planning
    Module Objectives:

    • Describe both obvious and subtle presentations of change in condition
    • Complete an effective assessment that identifies pertinent signs and symptoms related to condition changes
    • Understand how to effectively communicate condition changes to health care providers such as physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners
    • Work effectively with certified nursing assistants (CNAs) to identify and respond to resident condition changes

     

  • GERI-Res Clinical Coach Course Modules

    Module 1: Role of the Clinical Coach

    The Clinical Coach model for education has a long history dating back to the time of Florence Nightingale. Clinical Coaches serve as role models, educators, and socializers. Serving as resources and role models in one-to-one relationships, Clinical Coaches help socialize RN Residents to the nursing role through direct involvement in the teaching-learning process.

      Clinical Coaches:

    • Partner with RN Residents to determine and modify learning needs and goals
    • Facilitate opportunities for safe and effective nurse resident practice in the nursing home
    • Provide RN Residents with feedback regarding clinical progress
    • Serve as professional role models by demonstrating and implementing nursing practice in long term care
    • Provide RN Residents with a socialization experience

     
    Module 2: What Clinical Coaches Should Know about New Long Term Care Nurses
    Module Objectives:

    • Discuss the readiness of new nurse hires to begin LTC practice
    • Define strengths and limitations of the LTC setting that may support or hinder success of the new nurse hired in your organization
    • Identify strategies to develop a supportive environment for nurses new to your organization

     
    Module 3: Adult Learning: How New Nurses Learn
    Module Objectives:

    • List three characteristics that are unique to adult learning
    • Describe strategies to effectively teach adult learners
    • List factors that facilitate nurse and those that limit learning and knowledge transfer

     
    Module 4: Helping New Nurses Learn Clinical Knowledge and Expertise
    Module Objectives:

    • Describe the concepts and importance of clinical grasp and clinical forethought.
    • List the nursing transition phases as described by Benner, Tanner and colleagues.
    • Describe strategies to teach new nurses to become strong nurse colleagues.

     
    Module 5: Helping New Nurses Learn Clinical Judgement
    Module Objectives:

    • Define the key components of clinical judgment.
    • Describe examples of how a new nurse demonstrates advanced clinical judgment.
    • Reflect on your own case examples where clinical judgment enhanced your clinical practice.

     
    Module 6: Helping RN Residents Learn Interdisciplinary Practice
    Module Objectives:

    • Understand the importance of the Clinical Coach role in promoting interdisciplinary practice (IDP)
    • Identify key components of effective interdisciplinary health professions practice
    • Identify when it is important for nurses to initiate interdisciplinary collaboration
    • Identify strategies to promote RN Resident learning interdisciplinary practice skills in the long term care setting

     
    Module 7: Providing Feedback to New Nurses
    Module Objectives:

      • State the importance of the Clinical Coach providing feedback
      • List a variety of effective methods for providing feedback
      • Discuss strategies for assessing whether feedback with the RN Resident has been effective